Monday, March 27, 2006

Random stuff

Click for larger, correct aspect-ratio pics.



shy girl, on paper
shy girl, on paper



saw
saw



big saw
big saw



red painting 1
red painting 1



red painting 2
red painting 2



seagulls on the rainy river
seagulls on the rainy river



turtle drummer, remix
turtle drummer, remix



hand rattle, remix
hand rattle, remix



Pither's Point Park
Pither's Point Park





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4 comments:

JLB said...

I love Shy Girl... the way it walks your eyes all around the image!

Ooo... big machinery, right on. I'll never forget my visit to a cedar mill in Forks, WA where they were using some ENORMOUS saws like the one in the second image... One I saw was on a big swing arm without any sort of blade guard, and the dude operating it had no protective gear... it was amazing to watch him work! The saw was so old, they said, that there aren't any like it produced any more. Consequently, when it breaks a tooth, the just have to weld it back on!

blanks57 said...

Not to bother you and I know your not Ann Landers but if "natives" self govern should they also self tax and spend their own money. I didn't spend allot of time thinking up this question it just came to me after years of hearing about "natives" and their desire for self government.

not blanks 57 said...

whoo boy, blanks 57 (above poster) is nuts. i just checked out some of their blogs stuff. holy crap, i didn't realize canadia had paranoid weirdos. i thought the states had a monopoly on that. anyways, good thing he's got a virtual day room to mumble in.

Hoka-shay-honaqut said...

Hello blanks57;

You are right. I am not Ann Landers, but I'll try and give you a quick and relevant answer:

I do believe that First Nations should be allowed to levy and collect taxes and spend them as they see fit.

There are, however, a few obstacles to this desireable state of affairs:
-Often, the resource rights of the land that the reservations occupy has been taken "in trust" by the federal (and occasionally provincial) governments, so that the ability to license out the mineral and timber rights and collect the revenues from those operations has to go through those layers of government. Often these revenues are not allocated properly, or at all.
-Treaty obligations of the crown(federal) and provincial (where applicable) governments often have not been met, or are not followed in "good faith" by those governments. My fellow treaty 3 First Nations members receive a yearly "treaty payment", established at the signing of the treaty in 1873. At the time, it was a significant amount of money, but it wasn't tied to inflation (at least it has been interpreted as not being tied to inflation by the government), so it's pretty much worthless, nowadays.
$5.00
per year.
A true government to government relationship may put this financial portion of the agreement into realistic terms, so that all these immigrants squatting on Turtle Island will finally cough up the rent.
-Some First Nations (notably in B.C.) have NEVER signed treaties, and their land is illegally occupied; a reasonable claim on all taxation/revenues/resource profits/etc. arising from those lands, can be made.

These are, of course, simplifications of old, complex problems; but, I can think of a day, not too far off, when they can be resolved in some fashion.
:Eric